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Ear Cleansing Treatment

$50.00

Ear Cleansing Treatment

$50.00

This ear cleaning treatment will help remove excess wax build up in your ear to prevent future ear infections, hearing loss, and other problems.

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Description

This ear cleaning treatment will help remove excess wax build up in your ear to prevent future ear infections, hearing loss, and other problems. We will use a microscope light and camera to view the inner ear. Then we will use the elephant cleaning system with water to help with ear associated problems. The duration of the treatment varies depending on each client.

Ear wax is a normal product of the ear which protects the skin of the ear from water and infection. Ear wax is formed from wax glands in the external ear canal as well as other components such as dead skin, sweat, and oil. The primary component of ear wax is keratin (derived from dead skin). Ear wax thus differs slightly from cerumen which is the secretory product of the ceruminous glands in the external auditory canal (Hawke, 2002). Ear wax is not a foreign body — it is an intrinsic product of the lining of the ear.

While ear wax is generally simply felt to be a nuisance, in medieval times, ear wax was used as a component of pigment for illumination of manuscripts (Petrakis, 2000). Anthropologists have used cerumen type to tract human migratory patterns and epidemiologists have related cerumen type to breast cancer. (Roeser et al, 1997).

Different individuals vary considerably in the amount and consistency of their ear wax. There are two types described, wet and dry, which are inherited. Dry wax is common in Asia, while wet wax is common in western Europe. Dry wax, also known as “rice-bran wax”, contains by weight about 20% lipid (fat). Oddly enough, rice-bran wax is associated with a lower incidence of breast cancer (Hawke, 2002). According to Japanese researchers, a gene known as ATP-binding casette CII is important in controlling the type of ear wax you have. Without the contribution of this gene, one has dry (rice-bran) ear wax. (Yoshiura, Kinoshita et al. 2006). The high prevalence of dry wax may account for why the Japanese have so many ways of removing it (i.e. mimikaki).

Wet wax consists of approximately 50% fat (Burkhart et al, 2000). Wet wax can be either soft or hard, the hard wax being more likely to be impacted. Too little ear wax increases the risk of infection (Fairey et al, 1985). Too much wax also increases the incidence of infection and hearing loss. So, you want just enough.

While we are not aware of a study of this, some people (and some ears) are “wax producers”, and others remain wax free without much maintenance. This has some impact on ear wax management (see below). Two populations are known to have a high incidence of excessive/impacted cerumen: individuals with mental retardation and the elderly. (Roeser et al, 1997).

 

*This treatment does not include any sharp tools going inside of the ear.

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